eLetters

5 e-Letters

published between 2016 and 2019

  • Historical accuracy.

    Guillaume de Baillous (1538-1616) of France was one of the first to write in detail about muscle pain disorders.
    Myofascial Trigger Points Then and Now: A Historical and Scientific Perspective
    Jay P. Shah, MD, Nikki Thaker, BS, [...], and Lynn H. Gerber, MD.
    Best wishes,
    Max Forrester.

  • This paper should be withdrawn

    Dear Dr Landgren (author) / Dr Hallstrom (author) / Ms Knight (Editor: Acupuncture in Medicine) / Dr Godlee (Editor-in-Chief of The BMJ)

    I am requesting that you withdraw the publication “Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL)”. The data as presented shows that across the three trial groups A, B and control group C, there was a large reduction in colic across the trial period and that the largest absolute reduction in the amount of colicky crying was largest in the control group. The trial data as presented does not support the authors stated conclusion that acupuncture reduces crying in infants with colic.

    There are obvious causes for concern, including:

    The blinding of parents was inadequate. Rather than providing comfort, the authors statement “Nonetheless, among parents of infants who received acupuncture, the percentage of those who believed that the infant had received acupuncture increased at the later visits. This probably reflects the fact that infants receiving acupuncture were deriving greater benefit from treatment” reveals their bias and careless attitude. The data as presented shows that the absolute level of benefit from the treatment was much the same across the Groups so another explanation is required i.e. the parents knew their child was part of the non-control group, or perhaps that parents of children that improved ascribed this to acupunctu...

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  • Re: “Treating primary dysmenorrhoea with acupuncture: a narrative review of the relationship between acupuncture ‘dose’ and menstrual pain outcomes”

    Acknowledgments
    This work was supported by State Chinese Medicine Administration Bureau (Specific Scientific Research of Chinese Medicine Industry, no. 201407001-6B).

    Disclosure Statement
    No competing financial interests exist.

    Authors’ contributions
    HL drafted, CZ modified and RS translated the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version accepted for publication.

    Dear Editor,
    We read the above named paper by Armour and Smith with great interest. In order to guide clinical practice, this article provided evidence of a dose-effect relationship in treating primary dysmenorrhoea by acupuncture. However, we still have some concerns about this paper.
    The authors planned to exam the relationship between menstrual outcomes and dose components including neurophysiological dose (number of needles, retention time and mode of stimulation), cumulative dose (total number and frequency of treatments), needle location and treatment timing, but did not reach a clear conclusion [1]. Because dose-effect relationships are important, we would like to express our opinions about acupuncture‘dose’. In 1972, academician Shi Xuemin described a theory of "acupuncture manipulation quantitative arts", which is concerned with studying and determining the best dose of acupuncture for treatment. It includes four aspects: (1) the applied force; (2) the direction of applied force; (3) the optimal duration of reinforcing-reducing...

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  • Re: Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL)
    Stuart Dustan

    Dear Dr Landgren (author) / Dr Hallstrom (author) / Ms Knight (Editor: Acupuncture in Medicine) / Dr Godlee (Editor-in-Chief of The BMJ)

    I am writing to you with great concern and disappointment with regards to 1) the original article published, online, on the 16 January 2017 (Landgren and Hallstr?m, 2017 [1]) and, 2) the credibility of the Acupuncture in Medicine Journal collectively.

    I wish to share...

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  • Comment: Ultrasonography in acupuncture: potential uses for education and research
    Jason Lie

    Dear editor,

    I read Leow et al's article on Ultrasonography in acupuncture: potential uses for education & research 1 with interest.

    I am a consultant anaesthetist with an interest in regional anaesthesia & am certified in Medical Acupuncture by British Medical Acupuncture Society in the United Kingdom. I use ultrasound (US) regularly in my daily practice for both central neuraxial blocks (CNBs)...

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