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Acupuncture to improve fertility in Chinese patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome: what was lost?
  1. Seung Min Kathy Lee1,2,
  2. Junyoung Jo3
  1. 1Department of Clinical Korean Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  2. 2Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  3. 3Department of Korean Obstetrics and Gynecology, Conmaul Hospital of Korean Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  1. Correspondence to Dr Junyoung Jo, Department of Korean Obstetrics and Gynecology, Conmaul Hospital of Korean Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; studd{at}naver.com;jojunyoung82{at}gmail.com

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The recent study by Wu and colleagues,1 published in JAMA, found that, among Chinese women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), the use of acupuncture with or without clomiphene, compared with control acupuncture and placebo, did not increase live birth rate. This paper deserves much praise from the conventional and traditional medicine communities alike as it has overcome many limitations seen in acupuncture trials—with its factorial design, large number of participants, and the solid preclinical studies providing a neurophysiological rationale as to how acupuncture might work in this context. As a collaborative work produced by a global team of experts, rigorously designed and successfully completed, this trial is pioneering …

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