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Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL)
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  • Published on:
    This paper should be withdrawn

    Dear Dr Landgren (author) / Dr Hallstrom (author) / Ms Knight (Editor: Acupuncture in Medicine) / Dr Godlee (Editor-in-Chief of The BMJ)

    I am requesting that you withdraw the publication “Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL)”. The data as presented shows that across the three trial groups A, B and control group C, there was a large reduction in colic across the trial period and that the largest absolute reduction in the amount of colicky crying was largest in the control group. The trial data as presented does not support the authors stated conclusion that acupuncture reduces crying in infants with colic.

    There are obvious causes for concern, including:

    The blinding of parents was inadequate. Rather than providing comfort, the authors statement “Nonetheless, among parents of infants who received acupuncture, the percentage of those who believed that the infant had received acupuncture increased at the later visits. This probably reflects the fact that infants receiving acupuncture were deriving greater benefit from treatment” reveals their bias and careless attitude. The data as presented shows that the absolute level of benefit from the treatment was much the same across the Groups so another explanation is required i.e. the parents knew their child was part of the non-control group, or perhaps that parents of children that improved ascribed this to acupunctu...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: Effect of minimal acupuncture for infantile colic: a multicentre, three-armed, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (ACU-COL)

    Dear Dr Landgren (author) / Dr Hallstrom (author) / Ms Knight (Editor: Acupuncture in Medicine) / Dr Godlee (Editor-in-Chief of The BMJ)

    I am writing to you with great concern and disappointment with regards to 1) the original article published, online, on the 16 January 2017 (Landgren and Hallstr?m, 2017 [1]) and, 2) the credibility of the Acupuncture in Medicine Journal collectively.

    I wish to share...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.