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Trigger point acupuncture treatment of chronic low back pain in elderly patients – a blinded RCT
  1. Kazunori Itoh, research assistant, licensed acupuncturist1,
  2. Yasukazu Katsumi, professor2,
  3. Hiroshi Kitakoji, professor, licensed acupuncturist3
  1. 1
    Department of Clinical, Acupuncture and Moxibustion
  2. 2
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
  3. 3
    Meiji University of Oriental Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  1. k_itoh{at}muom.meiji-u.ac.jp

Abstract

Objective There is some evidence for the efficacy of acupuncture in chronic low back pain, but it remains unclear which acupuncture modes are most effective. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of two different modes of trigger point acupuncture on pain and quality of life in chronic low back pain patients compared to standard acupuncture treatment.

Methods Thirty five consecutive out-patients (25 women, 10 men; age range: 65–81 years) from the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Meiji University of Oriental Medicine, with non-radiating low back pain for at least six months and normal neurological examination, were randomised to one of three groups over 12 weeks. Each group received two phases of acupuncture treatment with an interval between them. Nine patients dropped out during the course of the study. The standard acupuncture group (n=9) received treatment at traditional acupuncture points for low back pain, while the other acupuncture groups received superficial (n=9) or deep (n=9) treatments on trigger points. Outcome measures were VAS pain intensity and Roland Morris Questionnaire.

Results After treatment, the group that received deep needling to trigger points reported less pain intensity and improved quality of life compared to the standard acupuncture group or the group that received superficial needling to trigger points, but the differences were not statistically significant. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity between the treatment and interval in the group that received deep needling to trigger points (P<0.01), but not in the standard acupuncture group or the group that received superficial needling to trigger points.

Conclusion These results suggest that deep needling to trigger points may be more effective in the treatment of low back pain in elderly patients than either standard acupuncture therapy, or superficial needling to trigger points.

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